Slow Life


Slow Life from Daniel Stoupin

"Slow" marine animals show their secret life under high magnification. Corals and sponges are very mobile creatures, but their motion is only detectable at different time scales compared to ours and requires time lapses to be seen. These animals build coral reefs and play crucial roles in the biosphere, yet we know almost nothing about their daily lives.

Learn more about what you see in my post: http://notes-from-dreamworlds.blogspot.com.au/2014/03/slow-life.html

Red Sea Highlights

This is a highlight reel mostly from two weeks of diving in southern Sudan aboard the Don Questo live-aboard, with supplementary footage from Saudi Arabia. The central Red Sea (southern Sudan in particular) is a truly fantastic place, home to an array of incredible sharks species, majestic manta rays, massive groupers, curious jacks, schools of barracudas and more. This video was created to showcase the incredible beauty of the region and, more importantly, to inspire and convince viewers that this largely unknown, unfished, and unexplored place is well worth preserving.

Alex Kattan is a masters student in marine science at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia. He loves the ocean and all its inhabitants, with a particular fascination with tropical coral reefs. He enjoys sharing this passion with others through education, outreach, film and social media. He can be reached by email at alexander.kattan@gmail.com.

Happy World Oceans Day!

Happy World Oceans Day 2014! ~ Together we have the power to protect the Ocean and all it’s marine life.

Join the MarineBio Conservation Society ~ Donate to the MarineBio Conservation Society

Discover 101+ ways you can help protect one of the most valuable resources on our Planet with the MarineBio Conservation Society: www.marinebio.org/oceans/conservation/local/

Learn more about #WorldOceansDay at: www.worldoceansday.org

Photo Credit ~ Christian Vizlwww.christianvizl.com / Christian Vizl UWPhotography

Saving Sharks in Indonesia

blacktip shark

From our friends at the Gili Shark Foundation:

Indonesia is the largest exporter of shark fins in the world. There is no current (or planned) legislation for the protection of reef sharks in Indonesia and CITES Appendix II (which only covers international fisheries) does not cover them either. This means that the fishermen around Indonesia are acting totally within the law by catching, killing and finning these animals. The animals are sold at the local fish markets for a small price in huge numbers. Ideally we would be able to use legislation to ban all fishing of sharks, however, this isn’t realistically going to happen any time soon. The local Indonesian fishermen will land anything they can from the sea in order to make some money. When we were at Tanjung Luar Market the array of reef fish, eels, sharks, rays and pelagics was unbelievable. They will take anything they can. Continue reading