Day in the Life: Ichthyologist (Fish Biologist)

Moises B. is an ichthyologist and Ph.D. Candidate working at the California Academy of Sciences. An ichthyologist is a fish biologist. His passion for ichthyology began at a young age when he used to snorkel in Panama, becoming really interested in all the creatures under the sea. Watch Moises give us insight into this really unique and exciting career!

Explore more career videos at http://connectedstudios.org/life_videos :-)

Confessions of a Marine Biologist

Adventures aren’t only in storybooks — I live them in remote locations, surrounded by wildlife, where I try to unlock nature’s mysteries (and try to survive to tell the tale). Subscribe and join me — it’s time to get the secret out… I’m Mike Gil, and I’m a marine biologist — a scientist, by profession.

See more at https://www.youtube.com/user/sciallorg/videos :-)

Forests of the Sea: Plankton


Ocean Drifters from Plymouth University.

“Ocean Drifters, a secret world beneath the waves” is a short film about plankton written, produced and directed by Dr Richard Kirby (Marine Institute Research Fellow, Plymouth University) with a narration by Sir David Attenborough and music by Richard Grassby-Lewis.

Drawing upon Richard Kirby’s plankton imagery, Ocean Drifters reveals how the plankton have shaped life on Earth and continue to influence our lives in ways that most of us never imagine.

Further information about the plankton can be found at the Ocean Drifters website (oceandrifters.org) and in the popular book about plankton also titled “Ocean Drifters, a secret world beneath the waves”.

The making of Ocean Drifters was supported by Carl Zeiss Ltd and the UK Natural Environment Research Council

Watch in HD and fullscreen for the best experience.

Deep ocean mysteries and wonders ~ TED-Ed


“In the deepest, darkest parts of the oceans are ecosystems with more diversity than a tropical rainforest. Taking us on a voyage into the ocean — from the deepest trenches to the remains of Titanic — marine biologist David Gallo explores the wonder and beauty of marine life. Find more TED-Ed videos on our new YouTube channel: youtube.com/TEDEd

More about David Gallo:

Race to the bottom of the sea… part 2

So I should probably begin with part 1…. Back in 1960, January 23rd to be precise, the first ever deep submersible dive occurred by two oceanographers, Don Walsh and Jacques Picard. Using the Bathyscaphe Trieste (above) they reached a depth of 10,911 m (35,797 ft) at the Challenger Deep section of the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean (11 km or about 7 miles deep). This so far, is still the only time this depth has ever been reached in the ocean by humans with it taking the Trieste five hours to reach the bottom and only being allowed 20 minutes at this depth due to the constraints of technology at the time. Continue reading

Explore the Ocean Depths in Google Earth

Google EarthThe Ocean in Google Earth combines renderings of underwater terrain with regional information from marine biologists and oceanographers to enable Google Earth viewers to explore the ocean realm and learn about marine life and other ocean-related areas of interest.

Given that science has only explored a small percentage of the vast ocean, which makes up 71% of this planet, this will be a unique and useful tool to help people gain an understanding of the importance of the marine environment.

Oceans are rarely discussed in the media during this era of greening the planet. Climate change is focused on the impact it will have on land, overfishing is a tremendous problem in the ocean, but few people are aware. The ocean is viewed superficially by most of humanity – we see the surface and assume the ocean is invulnerable to over-exploitation.

This tool will allow those with access to the web an up close and personal look at all ocean regions as well as access to information through fact files and videos and the ability to track satellite-tagged animals such as whales.

This tool is available on the latest version of Google Earth.

To read how the concept was born and implemented see: Google Earth Fills Its Watery Gaps from today’s New York Times.