10 year study reveals new marine species!


» View a slideshow at the Washington Post site of wonderful photos of marine life, including some bizarre new species involved in the COML Project.

» Find out more about The Census of Marine Life (don’t miss their image and video galleries) | Download the “First Census of Marine Life 2010: Highlights of a Decade of Discovery 64-page report that describes some of the scientific highlights of ten years of exploration, research and analysis undertaken by Census of Marine Life scientists.”

Well done! Here’s to another 10 years, so much to do, so little time!

Newly discovered deep sea lobster

Discovered by an international trio of scientists, the lobster, Dinochelus ausubeli, lives in the deep ocean water  near the Phillipines.

The new lobster has movable, well-developed eyestalks and an inverted T-plate in front of its mouth.

But its most striking feature is a mighty claw with a short, bulbous palm and extremely long, spiny fingers for capturing prey.

Dinochelus is derived from the Greek words dino, meaning terrible and fearful, and chelus, meaning claw.

All told, the Census of Marine Life sponsored 540 expeditions over 10 years, carried out by 2,700 researchers from more than 80 countries. It was, Ausubel says, the biggest project in the history of marine biology.

via Newly discovered deep sea lobster.

Census of Marine Life Expedition to Hawaii

Follow the expedition: http://www.hawaiiatolls.org

On Friday 6 October, a team of scientists embarked on an expedition to explore coral reef biodiversity in the recently designated Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument, the largest marine protected area in the world. The expedition is being led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center with funding from NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Continue reading