Reef Life of the Andaman

The following outstanding 2 hour video shows the amazing biodiversity of the marine life in the Andaman Sea (in the northeast Indian Ocean). Produced by Nick Hope at Bubble Vision, he again amazes us while introducing us to many rarely seen marine species the way they should be met, in their home under the sea.


Massive Coral Mortality & Bleaching

This is one of the most important reasons why we need to fight harder to stop climate change. The loss of these precious ecosystems is a tragedy.

The Wildlife Conservation Society has released initial field observations that indicate that a dramatic rise in the surface temperature in Indonesian waters has resulted in a large-scale bleaching event that has devastated coral populations.

WCS’s Indonesia Program “Rapid Response Unit” of marine biologists was dispatched to investigate coral bleaching reported in May in Aceh — a province of Indonesia located on the northern tip of the island of Sumatra. The initial survey carried out by the team revealed that over 60 percent of corals were bleached. Continue reading

Good news about the plight of corals?

I just came across this quote in an interview with International Society for Reef Studies President Richard Aronson on SeaWeb and was immediately inspired to share it with you:

The main thing that I would advise scientists, conservationists and the public to do is to take heart, be courageous and don’t give up on coral reefs and the rest of the marine environment. A lot of people get compassion fatigue, which is to say they are continually bombarded with what is wrong with coral reefs so they feel like giving up. But there are some things going right with reefs, both ecologically in terms of recovery of some coral populations, and in terms of conservation and policy initiatives.

If you are a scientist, manager, policymaker or concerned citizen, think for yourself. Formulate your own opinions, follow the science, read all you can about the issues and don’t follow the latest self-proclaimed ideological leader. Think about it all with a view as to what can we do to help save coral reefs. Continue reading

Why corals need urgent protection

Time Magazine published this great article earlier this month. Read:

You don’t have to be a marine biologist to understand the importance of corals — just ask any diver. The tiny underwater creatures are the architects of the beautiful, electric-colored coral reefs that lie in shallow tropical waters around the world. Divers swarm to them not merely for their intrinsic beauty, but because the reefs play host to a wealth of biodiversity unlike anywhere else in the underwater world. Coral reefs are home to more than 25% of total marine species. Take out the corals, and there are no reefs — remove the reefs, and entire ecosystems collapse.

Unfortunately, that’s exactly what appears to be happening around the world. Continue reading

Excess CO2 Threatens Marine Life

Staghorn coral, Bonaire - Aug, 2004

By Rosanne Skirble, Washington, D.C.

The chemistry of the world’s oceans is changing with increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere because of the burning of fossil fuels in cars and power plants. A report released recently by the National Center for Atmospheric Research says the change in the air is putting marine life and ecosystems at great risk. Continue reading

World’s coral reefs left vulnerable by paper parks

This is extremely troubling. What good are policies and plans if they’re written—then ignored or implemented but poorly monitored? What can we do to change this? Again, this seems a perfect example for why the world needs a global governing body with power to enforce and monitor policies. Is that too unrealistic to even consider?

World’s coral reefs left vulnerable by paper parks

First-ever analysis reveals that most coral reef protected areas are too small, far apart and are at risk from poaching and external human threats

Although 18.7% of the world’s coral reefs are within “Marine Protected Areas” (MPAs) less that 2% are within MPAs with sound management, scientists report in the June 23 edition of Science Magazine.

MPAs are designed to limit human activities in a particular location to protect the marine ecosystem within their boundaries. This new analysis provides an evaluation of the world’s coral reef MPAs based on their regulations on extraction, prevention of poaching, incidence of external human threats such as pollution, coastal development and overfishing, MPAs size and MPA distance to neighbor protected areas. Continue reading