Forests of the Sea: Plankton


Ocean Drifters from Plymouth University.

“Ocean Drifters, a secret world beneath the waves” is a short film about plankton written, produced and directed by Dr Richard Kirby (Marine Institute Research Fellow, Plymouth University) with a narration by Sir David Attenborough and music by Richard Grassby-Lewis.

Drawing upon Richard Kirby’s plankton imagery, Ocean Drifters reveals how the plankton have shaped life on Earth and continue to influence our lives in ways that most of us never imagine.

Further information about the plankton can be found at the Ocean Drifters website (oceandrifters.org) and in the popular book about plankton also titled “Ocean Drifters, a secret world beneath the waves”.

The making of Ocean Drifters was supported by Carl Zeiss Ltd and the UK Natural Environment Research Council

Watch in HD and fullscreen for the best experience.

New book Creatures of the Deep takes readers on an extraordinary visual and literary journey

Creatures of the Deep, has just been published in a new edition — with all new photos and twice the size of the award-winning 1st edition. Erich Hoyt, MarineBio’s Director of Marine Mammals, takes readers on a journey to the deep that is part-deep sea biology, part-history of exploration, part ocean ecology and part geology. Great stories of marine life and science uncovering the secrets of the ocean deep. Deep discounts are currently offered through all the amazon websites.

hoyt-1 Continue reading

Giant squid caught on film in its natural habitat for the first time

Giant Squids, Architeuthis dux

A research crew from Japan’s National Science Museum have managed to capture on film for the first time a giant squid (Architeuthis) in its deep sea natural habitat. Working with Japanese public broadcaster NHK and the US Discovery Channel, the researchers found the massive invertebrate at a depth of a depth of 630 metres as the animal was holding on to bait swimming against the current in the depths. The footage was filmed in the Pacific Ocean near the Ogasawara Islands, 1000 km south of Japan, an area where two previous sightings in 2006 and 2012, have been reported. Continue reading

Newly discovered deep sea lobster

Discovered by an international trio of scientists, the lobster, Dinochelus ausubeli, lives in the deep ocean water  near the Phillipines.

The new lobster has movable, well-developed eyestalks and an inverted T-plate in front of its mouth.

But its most striking feature is a mighty claw with a short, bulbous palm and extremely long, spiny fingers for capturing prey.

Dinochelus is derived from the Greek words dino, meaning terrible and fearful, and chelus, meaning claw.

All told, the Census of Marine Life sponsored 540 expeditions over 10 years, carried out by 2,700 researchers from more than 80 countries. It was, Ausubel says, the biggest project in the history of marine biology.

via Newly discovered deep sea lobster.