Day in the Life: Ichthyologist (Fish Biologist)

Moises B. is an ichthyologist and Ph.D. Candidate working at the California Academy of Sciences. An ichthyologist is a fish biologist. His passion for ichthyology began at a young age when he used to snorkel in Panama, becoming really interested in all the creatures under the sea. Watch Moises give us insight into this really unique and exciting career!

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Deep ocean mysteries and wonders ~ TED-Ed

“In the deepest, darkest parts of the oceans are ecosystems with more diversity than a tropical rainforest. Taking us on a voyage into the ocean — from the deepest trenches to the remains of Titanic — marine biologist David Gallo explores the wonder and beauty of marine life. Find more TED-Ed videos on our new YouTube channel:

More about David Gallo:

MarineBio Expeditions

We’re starting to think about scheduling expeditions again to gather data, photos, video, etc. of marine life and issues for Check out MarineBio’s Expedition home page for the possibilities and contact us if you’re interested in joining us.

Seven new fish species

Starksia blenniesScienceDaily (Feb. 5, 2011) – Things are not always what they seem when it comes to fish — something scientists at the Smithsonian Institution and the Ocean Science Foundation are finding out. Using modern genetic analysis, combined with traditional examination of morphology, the scientists discovered that what were once thought to be three species of blenny in the genus Starksia are actually 10 distinct species. Continue reading

10 year study reveals new marine species!

» View a slideshow at the Washington Post site of wonderful photos of marine life, including some bizarre new species involved in the COML Project.

» Find out more about The Census of Marine Life (don’t miss their image and video galleries) | Download the “First Census of Marine Life 2010: Highlights of a Decade of Discovery 64-page report that describes some of the scientific highlights of ten years of exploration, research and analysis undertaken by Census of Marine Life scientists.”

Well done! Here’s to another 10 years, so much to do, so little time!

Newly discovered deep sea lobster

Discovered by an international trio of scientists, the lobster, Dinochelus ausubeli, lives in the deep ocean water  near the Phillipines.

The new lobster has movable, well-developed eyestalks and an inverted T-plate in front of its mouth.

But its most striking feature is a mighty claw with a short, bulbous palm and extremely long, spiny fingers for capturing prey.

Dinochelus is derived from the Greek words dino, meaning terrible and fearful, and chelus, meaning claw.

All told, the Census of Marine Life sponsored 540 expeditions over 10 years, carried out by 2,700 researchers from more than 80 countries. It was, Ausubel says, the biggest project in the history of marine biology.

via Newly discovered deep sea lobster.