HOI the Hawaiian Monk Seal


Hawaiian Monk Seal meets Manta Rays from Manta Ray Advocates Hawaii.

“Waimanu – a Hawaiian Monk seal – was seen at the Manta Ray Night Dive a few times over the past few weeks, but always on the dark outskirts. Last weekend, we captured NEVER-BEFORE-SEEN footage of Waimanu swimming through the dive site while the Manta Rays were feeding on plankton.

The Hawaiian Monk seal is considered a critically endangered animal with a population of approximately 1100. Most Hawaiian Monk Seals live around the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands; only a few populate the main Hawaiian Islands. Three monk seals inhabit the Big Island and Waimanu – the only female – is currently pregnant.”

CONNECT WITH US:
Blog: http://www.mantarayshawaii.com/_blog/Manta_Rays_in_kona_Hawaii
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Manta-Ray-Advocates-Hawaii/225059507634998

Watch in HD and fullscreen for the best experience.

What’s it like to be an aquanaut?

Find out October 12-21!

Aquarius 2010: If Reefs Could Talk
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live underwater? Well, from October 12-21 you can find out by tuning in to daily broadcasts shot live from an undersea research lab, the only one of its kind in the world. The Aquarius lab is located off the coast of Key Largo, Florida, 60 feet below the surface at the base of one of the many beautiful coral reefs comprising the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. The scientific researchers or “aquanauts” that live in Aquarius, as well as scientists operating from the surface, are sharing their experience and intimate knowledge of the ocean while performing their latest mission, Aquarius 2010: If Reefs Could Talk. In addition to the live shows, the aquanaut team will keep followers continually updated on the mission’s progress through their expedition blog, Twitter and Facebook pages.

Can you hear me now?

dolphins.jpgWhen David was diving in southeast Florida almost exactly 2 years ago, he was thrilled to see a pod of dolphins, which he was told were a rare sight in the area in February. A few days later he was disturbed to see a more common sight — a submarine conducting sonar testing. After he returned home, we learned that a number of dolphins had stranded in the Florida Keys, a relatively short distance from where he was diving, a few days after he saw them. Continue reading

Census of Marine Life Expedition to Hawaii

Follow the expedition: http://www.hawaiiatolls.org

On Friday 6 October, a team of scientists embarked on an expedition to explore coral reef biodiversity in the recently designated Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument, the largest marine protected area in the world. The expedition is being led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center with funding from NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Continue reading