Saving Sharks in Indonesia

blacktip shark

From our friends at the Gili Shark Foundation:

Indonesia is the largest exporter of shark fins in the world. There is no current (or planned) legislation for the protection of reef sharks in Indonesia and CITES Appendix II (which only covers international fisheries) does not cover them either. This means that the fishermen around Indonesia are acting totally within the law by catching, killing and finning these animals. The animals are sold at the local fish markets for a small price in huge numbers. Ideally we would be able to use legislation to ban all fishing of sharks, however, this isn’t realistically going to happen any time soon. The local Indonesian fishermen will land anything they can from the sea in order to make some money. When we were at Tanjung Luar Market the array of reef fish, eels, sharks, rays and pelagics was unbelievable. They will take anything they can. Continue reading

Reef Life of the Andaman

The following outstanding 2 hour video shows the amazing biodiversity of the marine life in the Andaman Sea (in the northeast Indian Ocean). Produced by Nick Hope at Bubble Vision, he again amazes us while introducing us to many rarely seen marine species the way they should be met, in their home under the sea.


In Awe of the Shark

“We got some our shark scientists together to tell us how they feel about sharks….” In Awe of the Shark from Save Our Seas Foundation.

More than 90% of all top marine predators have disappeared from the oceans.

– Myers et al. 2007; MacKenzie et al. 2009

“It appears that ecosystems such as Caribbean coral reefs need sharks to ensure the stability of the entire system.”

– Enric Sala, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Visit the Save Our Seas Foundation to learn more and get involved: http://saveourseas.com

Together we can make the difference!

MarineBio Expeditions


We’re starting to think about scheduling expeditions again to gather data, photos, video, etc. of marine life and issues for marinebio.org. Check out MarineBio’s Expedition home page for the possibilities and contact us if you’re interested in joining us.

Shark week 2010

So I mosey on over to the Shark Week homepage and the first thing I see is the word ATTACK. Sigh. I guess to draw people into watching shark week they have to plaster the word ATTACK everywhere to get people’s attention. The good news is, they are making an effort toward shark conservation on the website: http://dsc.discovery.com/sharks/shark-facts-tab-04.html. There’s lots of information on sharks and shark conservation there. In between reading, you can go watch “Into the Shark Bite!” and “Shark Attack Survival Guide!” and “Shark Bite Beach!” Continue reading

Save the Great Whites too!

Expedition Great White: Feeding Frenzy

Sunday, June 6, 2010, at 9 p.m. ET/PT (Special Series Premiere)

“…what I really want … is to understand the entire life cycle of white sharks.… Once we learn that, we could help put together a comprehensive management plan to protect white sharks year round.” – Dr. Michael Domeier

A hundred sixty miles off the coast of Baja California, a team of world-class anglers will land one of the most challenging fish imaginable: the great white shark. Continue reading

World’s first “shark sanctuary”

Palau to create the world’s first “shark sanctuary”, banning all commercial shark fishing in its waters.

We couldn’t agree more and applaud President Toribiong’s efforts to protect the remaining sharks in our ocean. Hopefully other nations will follow suit. In 2006, French Polynesia decreed shark fishing, and therefore shark finning, illegal in its waters for all sharks except the mako shark, see page 9 of Oceana’s Report: Fishy Business [2 MB PDF]). Making shark fishing/finning illegal is the first great step. Enforcement of that law is the next, and is often where conservation efforts fail. We hope this is not the case for either Palau or French Polynesia or those that follow (come on U.S.A.).

The President of the tiny Pacific republic, Johnson Toribiong, announced the sanctuary during Friday’s session of the UN General Assembly.

With half of the world’s oceanic sharks at risk of extinction, conservationists regard the move as “game-changing”. Continue reading

Great white sharks hunt just like Hannibal Lecter?

Great white sharks hunt just like Hannibal Lecter
By SETH BORENSTEIN

WASHINGTON (AP) — Great white sharks have some things in common with human serial killers, a new study says: They don’t attack at random, but stalk specific victims, lurking out of sight.

The sharks hang back and observe from a not-too-close, not-too-far base, hunt strategically, and learn from previous attempts, according to a study being published online Monday in the Journal of Zoology.

Researchers used a serial killer profiling method to figure out just how the fearsome ocean predator hunts, something that’s been hard to observe beneath the surface.

Great white sharks

“There’s some strategy going on,” said study co-author Neil Hammerschlag, a shark researcher at the University of Miami who observed 340 great white shark attacks on seals off an island in South Africa. “It’s more than sharks lurking at the water waiting to go after them.” Continue reading

Good news for marine conservation/sharks

Just two weeks shy of his final day as President, George W. Bush announced today that 195,280 square miles will be designated as three new marine national monuments in the Pacific Ocean. Contrary to his resistance to sign the Kyoto Protocol and reduce greenhouse gas emissions and his other unpopular environmental policies, Bush is leaving a decent legacy when it comes to the ocean. This good news combined with the good news of a bill to ban shark finning in the US put forth in the new session of Congress (sea below) put a smile on my face!

Diodon holocanthusFrom his press release:

On June 15, 2006, I established the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument, and on May 15, 2007, I instructed the U.S. delegation to the International Maritime Organization to submit a proposal for international measures to enhance protection of the Monument. On April 4, 2008, the International Maritime Organization adopted our proposal, and the Papahanaumokuakea Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) was established. Continue reading

Sharkwater now on DVD

I HIGHLY recommend this movie. Don’t rent it on DVD. Buy it! And have a shark party to share it with your friends and family.

Though some might at first think this is another shark “slasher” movie, the film is actually a compassionate argument for shark protection. The sharks and other marine creatures are beautifully filmed, which provides a strong juxtaposition against filmaker Rob Stewart’s coverage of the brutal sharkfin trade. Not for the faint of heart, there are scenes of wholesale shark-slaughter for their fins (a delicacy in China and sold for medicinal purposes in China and other Asian countries). Continue reading

Shark fin soup being sold on Amazon

A new Plankton Forums member recently posted that Amazon is selling two brands of shark fin soup. Here is the information he posted:

It seems that Amazon.com is carrying shark fin soup through two third-party vendors, Dragonfly Shark and American Roland Food Corp. With all the controversy surrounding shark fins and the horrible practices used to harvest fins, Amazon should be ashamed to be carrying shark fin soup and should rectify the problem immediately by pulling all shark fin products from their catalog.

What you can do: Continue reading