What are animals thinking and feeling?

Everyone should watch this…. From the author of some of our favorites books: “Song for the Blue Ocean”, “Eye of the Albatross” and recently “Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel”, Dr. Carl Safina, President of The Safina Center at Stony Brook, presents:

“What’s going on inside the brains of animals? Can we know what, or if, they’re thinking and feeling? Carl Safina thinks we can. Using discoveries and anecdotes that span ecology, biology and behavioral science, he weaves together stories of whales, wolves, elephants and albatrosses to argue that just as we think, feel, use tools and express emotions, so too do the other creatures – and minds – that share the Earth with us.”

Deep ocean mysteries and wonders ~ TED-Ed

“In the deepest, darkest parts of the oceans are ecosystems with more diversity than a tropical rainforest. Taking us on a voyage into the ocean — from the deepest trenches to the remains of Titanic — marine biologist David Gallo explores the wonder and beauty of marine life. Find more TED-Ed videos on our new YouTube channel: youtube.com/TEDEd

More about David Gallo:

Check out the TEDx Oil Spill conference

TEDx oil spill conferenceIf you haven’t already, check out the TEDx Oil Spill conference. It was held/streamed live on June 28 from Washington DC and featured an impressive number of speakers including Sylvia Earle, Carl Safina, Philippe Cousteau, David Gallo (Woods Hole), Andrew Sharpless (Oceana) and many others on the oil spill, the future of energy, and what this event means for our blue planet. The oil spill is a call to action for all oceans. Topics include mitigation of the spill and the impending cleanup efforts; energy alternatives; policy and economics; as well as new technology that can help us build a self-reliant culture.

A Message From Sylvia Earle

Coral reefs off Florida
Editor’s note: Oceanographer Sylvia Earle believes we can save our seas and ourselves with an intelligent attitude to the Earth’s blue life-support system. Here she expresses her opinion for CNN.

(CNN) — Since I began exploring the ocean as a marine scientist 50 years ago, more has been learned about the ocean than during all preceding history.

At the same time, more has been lost.

Two weeks ago I testified before U.S. Congress on the ecological impact of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. I did so with perspective gained while sloshing around oiled beaches and marshes among dead and dying animals, diving under sheets of oily water and for years — as a founder and executive of engineering companies — of working with those in the oil industry responsible for developing and operating sophisticated equipment in the sea. Continue reading